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Small increases in plasma sodium are associated with higher risk of mortality in a healthy population

Authors
Oh S.W.Baek S.H.An J.N.Goo H.S.Kim S.Na K.Y.Chae D.W.Kim S.Chin H.J.
Issue Date
2013
Keywords
Age; Blood Pressure; Mortality; Plasma sodium; Sex characteristics
Citation
Journal of Korean Medical Science, v.28, no.7, pp.1034 - 1040
Indexed
SCIE
SCOPUS
KCI
Journal Title
Journal of Korean Medical Science
Volume
28
Number
7
Start Page
1034
End Page
1040
URI
https://scholarworks.korea.ac.kr/kumedicine/handle/2020.sw.kumedicine/11356
DOI
10.3346/jkms.2013.28.7.1034
ISSN
1011-8934
Abstract
Elevated blood pressure (BP) is the most common cause of cardiovascular disease. Salt intake has a strong influence on BP, and plasma sodium (pNa) is increased with progressive increases in salt intake. However, the associations with pNa and BP had been reported inconsistently. We evaluated the association between pNa and BP, and estimated the risks of all-cause-mortality according to pNa levels. On the basis of data collected from health checkups during 1995-2009, 97,009 adult subjects were included. Positive correlations between pNa and systolic BP, diastolic BP, and pulse pressure (PP) were noted in participants with pNa = 138 mM/L (P < 0.001). In participants aged = 50 yr, SBP, DBP, and PP were positively associated with pNa. In participants with metabolic syndrome components, the differences in SBP and DBP according to pNa were greater (P < 0.001). A cumulative incidence of mortality was increased with increasing pNa in women aged = 50 yr during the median 4.2-yr-follow-up (P < 0.001). In women, unadjusted risks for mortality were increased according to sodium levels. After adjustment, pNa = 145 mM/L was related to mortality. The positive correlation between pNa and BP is stronger in older subjects, women, and subjects with metabolic syndrome components. The incidence and adjusted risks of mortality increase with increasing pNa in women aged = 50 yr © 2013 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.
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Oh, Se Won
Anam Hospital (Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, Anam Hospital)
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