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Conversions in laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer

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dc.contributor.authorvan der Pas M.H.G.M.-
dc.contributor.authorDeijen C.L.-
dc.contributor.authorAbis G.S.A.-
dc.contributor.authorde Lange-de Klerk E.S.M.-
dc.contributor.authorHaglind E.-
dc.contributor.authorFürst A.-
dc.contributor.authorLacy A.M.-
dc.contributor.authorCuesta M.A.-
dc.contributor.authorBonjer H.J.-
dc.contributor.authorFor the COLOR II study group-
dc.contributor.authord’Hoore A.-
dc.contributor.authorBirch D.-
dc.contributor.authorDeGara C.-
dc.contributor.authorJamieson C.-
dc.contributor.authorPeiman P.-
dc.contributor.authorJensen K.J.-
dc.contributor.authorBulut O.-
dc.contributor.authorJess P.-
dc.contributor.authorRosenberg J.-
dc.contributor.authorHarvald T.-
dc.contributor.authorOvesen H.-
dc.contributor.authorIesalnieks I.-
dc.contributor.authorAgha A.-
dc.contributor.authorJaeger C.-
dc.contributor.authorKreis M.-
dc.contributor.authorKasparek M.-
dc.contributor.authorFürst A.-
dc.contributor.authorLiebig-Hoerl G.-
dc.contributor.authorKim S.H.-
dc.contributor.authorBonjer J.-
dc.contributor.authorvan der Peet D.-
dc.contributor.authorCuesta M.-
dc.contributor.authorvan der Pas M.-
dc.contributor.authorBuunen M.-
dc.contributor.authorAbis G.-
dc.contributor.authorDeijen C.-
dc.contributor.authorde Lange-de Klerk E.-
dc.contributor.authorHop W.-
dc.contributor.authorNeijenhuis P.-
dc.contributor.authorCoene P.P.-
dc.contributor.authorvan der Harst E.-
dc.contributor.authorvan ‘t Riet Y.-
dc.contributor.authorBemelman W.-
dc.contributor.authorGerhards M.-
dc.contributor.authorPrins H.-
dc.contributor.authorTargarona E.-
dc.contributor.authorBalague C.-
dc.contributor.authorMartinez C.-
dc.contributor.authorOsorio J.F.-
dc.contributor.authorMolina G.-
dc.contributor.authorLacy A.-
dc.contributor.authorDelgado S.-
dc.contributor.authorLujan J.-
dc.contributor.authorValero G.-
dc.contributor.authorAlonso-Poza A.-
dc.contributor.authorLosadar M.-
dc.contributor.authorArgudo S.-
dc.contributor.authorLackberg Z.-
dc.contributor.authorSkullman S.-
dc.contributor.authorKurlberg G.-
dc.contributor.authorHaglind E.-
dc.contributor.authorAndersson J.-
dc.contributor.authorAngenete E.-
dc.contributor.authorEkelund J.-
dc.contributor.authorKressner U.-
dc.contributor.authorMatthiessen P.-
dc.date.available2020-11-02T10:41:01Z-
dc.date.created2020-10-19-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.issn0930-2794-
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.korea.ac.kr/kumedicine/handle/2020.sw.kumedicine/5651-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Laparoscopic surgery offers patients with rectal cancer short-term benefits and similar survival rates as open surgery. However, selecting patients who are suitable candidates for laparoscopic surgery is essential to prevent intra-operative conversion from laparoscopic to open surgery. Clinical and pathological variables were studied among patients who had converted laparoscopic surgeries within the COLOR II trial to improve patient selection for laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. Methods: Between January 20, 2004, and May 4, 2010, 1044 patients with rectal cancer enrolled in the COLOR II trial and were randomized to either laparoscopic or open surgery. Of 693 patients who had laparoscopic surgery, 114 (16 %) were converted to open surgery. Predictive factors were studied using multivariate analyses, and morbidity and mortality rates were determined. Results: Factors correlating with conversion were as follows: age above 65 years (OR 1.9; 95 % CI 1.2–3.0: p = 0.003), BMI greater than 25 (OR 2.7; 95 % CI 1.7–4.3: p < 0.001), and tumor location more than 5 cm from the anal verge (OR 0.5; CI 0.3–0.9). Gender was not significantly related to conversion (p = 0.14). In the converted group, blood loss was greater (p < 0.001) and operating time was longer (p = 0.028) compared with the non-converted laparoscopies. Hospital stay did not differ (p = 0.06). Converted procedures were followed by more postoperative complications compared with laparoscopic or open surgery (p = 0.041 and p = 0.042, respectively). Mortality was similar in the laparoscopic and converted groups. Conclusions: Age above 65 years, BMI greater than 25, and tumor location between 5 and 15 cm from the anal verge were risk factors for conversion of laparoscopic to open surgery in patients with rectal cancer. © 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York.-
dc.language영어-
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC-
dc.subjectadult-
dc.subjectaged-
dc.subjectArticle-
dc.subjectbleeding-
dc.subjectbody mass-
dc.subjectcontrolled study-
dc.subjectconversion to open surgery-
dc.subjectfemale-
dc.subjecthospitalization-
dc.subjecthuman-
dc.subjectlaparoscopic surgery-
dc.subjectmajor clinical study-
dc.subjectmale-
dc.subjectmorbidity-
dc.subjectmortality rate-
dc.subjectmulticenter study-
dc.subjectopen surgery-
dc.subjectoperation duration-
dc.subjectoutcome assessment-
dc.subjectpatient selection-
dc.subjectpostoperative complication-
dc.subjectpriority journal-
dc.subjectrandomized controlled trial-
dc.subjectrectum cancer-
dc.subjectrisk factor-
dc.subjectage-
dc.subjectanal canal-
dc.subjectclinical trial-
dc.subjectlaparoscopy-
dc.subjectlength of stay-
dc.subjectmiddle aged-
dc.subjectmultivariate analysis-
dc.subjectoperative blood loss-
dc.subjectpathology-
dc.subjectphase 2 clinical trial-
dc.subjectpredictive value-
dc.subjectprocedures-
dc.subjectrectum tumor-
dc.subjectstatistics and numerical data-
dc.subjectsurvival rate-
dc.subjectAge Factors-
dc.subjectAged-
dc.subjectAnal Canal-
dc.subjectBlood Loss, Surgical-
dc.subjectBody Mass Index-
dc.subjectConversion to Open Surgery-
dc.subjectFemale-
dc.subjectHumans-
dc.subjectLaparoscopy-
dc.subjectLength of Stay-
dc.subjectMale-
dc.subjectMiddle Aged-
dc.subjectMultivariate Analysis-
dc.subjectOperative Time-
dc.subjectPatient Selection-
dc.subjectPredictive Value of Tests-
dc.subjectRectal Neoplasms-
dc.subjectRisk Factors-
dc.subjectSurvival Rate-
dc.titleConversions in laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.affiliatedAuthorKim S.H.-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00464-016-5228-8-
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-84992130112-
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationSurgical Endoscopy, v.31, no.5, pp.2263 - 2270-
dc.relation.isPartOfSurgical Endoscopy-
dc.citation.titleSurgical Endoscopy-
dc.citation.volume31-
dc.citation.number5-
dc.citation.startPage2263-
dc.citation.endPage2270-
dc.type.rimsART-
dc.type.docTypeArticle-
dc.description.journalClass1-
dc.description.journalRegisteredClassscie-
dc.description.journalRegisteredClassscopus-
dc.subject.keywordPlusadult-
dc.subject.keywordPlusaged-
dc.subject.keywordPlusArticle-
dc.subject.keywordPlusbleeding-
dc.subject.keywordPlusbody mass-
dc.subject.keywordPluscontrolled study-
dc.subject.keywordPlusconversion to open surgery-
dc.subject.keywordPlusfemale-
dc.subject.keywordPlushospitalization-
dc.subject.keywordPlushuman-
dc.subject.keywordPluslaparoscopic surgery-
dc.subject.keywordPlusmajor clinical study-
dc.subject.keywordPlusmale-
dc.subject.keywordPlusmorbidity-
dc.subject.keywordPlusmortality rate-
dc.subject.keywordPlusmulticenter study-
dc.subject.keywordPlusopen surgery-
dc.subject.keywordPlusoperation duration-
dc.subject.keywordPlusoutcome assessment-
dc.subject.keywordPluspatient selection-
dc.subject.keywordPluspostoperative complication-
dc.subject.keywordPluspriority journal-
dc.subject.keywordPlusrandomized controlled trial-
dc.subject.keywordPlusrectum cancer-
dc.subject.keywordPlusrisk factor-
dc.subject.keywordPlusage-
dc.subject.keywordPlusanal canal-
dc.subject.keywordPlusclinical trial-
dc.subject.keywordPluslaparoscopy-
dc.subject.keywordPluslength of stay-
dc.subject.keywordPlusmiddle aged-
dc.subject.keywordPlusmultivariate analysis-
dc.subject.keywordPlusoperative blood loss-
dc.subject.keywordPluspathology-
dc.subject.keywordPlusphase 2 clinical trial-
dc.subject.keywordPluspredictive value-
dc.subject.keywordPlusprocedures-
dc.subject.keywordPlusrectum tumor-
dc.subject.keywordPlusstatistics and numerical data-
dc.subject.keywordPlussurvival rate-
dc.subject.keywordPlusAge Factors-
dc.subject.keywordPlusAged-
dc.subject.keywordPlusAnal Canal-
dc.subject.keywordPlusBlood Loss, Surgical-
dc.subject.keywordPlusBody Mass Index-
dc.subject.keywordPlusConversion to Open Surgery-
dc.subject.keywordPlusFemale-
dc.subject.keywordPlusHumans-
dc.subject.keywordPlusLaparoscopy-
dc.subject.keywordPlusLength of Stay-
dc.subject.keywordPlusMale-
dc.subject.keywordPlusMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.keywordPlusMultivariate Analysis-
dc.subject.keywordPlusOperative Time-
dc.subject.keywordPlusPatient Selection-
dc.subject.keywordPlusPredictive Value of Tests-
dc.subject.keywordPlusRectal Neoplasms-
dc.subject.keywordPlusRisk Factors-
dc.subject.keywordPlusSurvival Rate-
dc.subject.keywordAuthorConversion-
dc.subject.keywordAuthorLaparoscopic surgery-
dc.subject.keywordAuthorRectal cancer-
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