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Detecting hepatitis B virus in surgical smoke emitted during laparoscopic surgery

Authors
Kwak, Han DeokKim, Seon-HahnSeo, Yeon SeokSong, Ki-Joon
Issue Date
Dec-2016
Publisher
BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP
Keywords
Surgical smoke; Hepatitis B virus; HBV; Laparoscopic surgery; Transmission
Citation
OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, v.73, no.12, pp.857 - 863
Indexed
SCIE
SCOPUS
Journal Title
OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE
Volume
73
Number
12
Start Page
857
End Page
863
URI
https://scholarworks.korea.ac.kr/kumedicine/handle/2020.sw.kumedicine/5792
DOI
10.1136/oemed-2016-103724
ISSN
1351-0711
Abstract
Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission is known to occur through direct contact with infected blood. There has been some suspicion that the virus can also be detected in aerosol form. However, this has never been directly shown. The purpose of this study was to sample and analyse surgical smoke from laparoscopic surgeries on patients with hepatitis B to determine whether HBV is present. Methods A total of 11 patients who underwent laparoscopic or robotic abdominal surgeries between October 2014 and February 2015 at Korea University Anam Hospital were included in this study. A high efficiency collector was used to obtain surgical smoke in the form of hydrosol. The smoke was analysed by using nested PCR. Results Robotic or laparoscopic colorectal resections were performed in 5 cases, laparoscopic gastrectomies in 3 cases and laparoscopic hepatic wedge resections in another 3 cases. Preoperatively, all of the patients had positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). 2 patients had detectable HBsAb, and 2 were positive for hepatitis B e antigen. 3 patients were taking antihepatitis B viral medications at the time of the study. The viral load measured in the patients' blood was undetectable to 1.7x10(8)IU/mL. HBV was detected in surgical smoke in 10 of the 11 cases. Conclusions HBV is detectable in surgical smoke. This study provides preliminary data in the investigation of airborne HBV infection.
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1. Basic Science > Department of Microbiology > 1. Journal Articles
2. Clinical Science > Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology > 1. Journal Articles
2. Clinical Science > Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery > 1. Journal Articles

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