Detailed Information

Cited 25 time in webofscience Cited 24 time in scopus
Metadata Downloads

Suicide from carbon monoxide poisoning in South Korea: 2006-2012

Authors
Choi, Young-RimCha, Eun ShilChang, Shu-SenKhang, Young-HoLee, Won Jin
Issue Date
1-Oct-2014
Publisher
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Keywords
Coal briquette; Copycat; Epidemic; Intentional poisoning; Mortality
Citation
JOURNAL OF AFFECTIVE DISORDERS, v.167, pp.322 - 325
Journal Title
JOURNAL OF AFFECTIVE DISORDERS
Volume
167
Start Page
322
End Page
325
URI
https://scholarworks.korea.ac.kr/kumedicine/handle/2020.sw.kumedicine/8838
DOI
10.1016/j.jad.2014.06.026
ISSN
0165-0327
Abstract
Backgrounds: Suicide from carbon monoxide poisoning by burning coal briquette or barbecue charcoal increased rapidly in some East Asian countries in the recent decade. The purpose of this study was to examine trends in suicides from carbon monoxide poisoning in South Korea and their epidemiologic characteristics. Methods: We presented age-standardized mortality rates of carbon monoxide suicide and compared them with those of suicide by other methods using registered death data from Statistics Korea (South Korea) from 2006 to 2012. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to estimate odds ratios of carbon monoxide suicide by socio-demographic characteristics before and after the marked increase in carbon monoxide suicide in September 2008. Results: The number of carbon monoxide suicides in South Korea was only 34 in 2006 but rapidly increased to 267 in 2008 and was 1125 in 2012, with the age-standardized rates of 0.06 (2006), 0.48 (2008), and 1.97 (2012) per 100,000 population respectively (a striking 3,183% increase in 2006-2012). Suicide by carbon monoxide poisoning showed greater odds ratios among men, younger age groups, single or the divorced, and those with high education and non-manual jobs compared with suicides by other methods. Limitations: This study only used data for fatal self-poisoning by carbon monoxide (non-fatal cases not included) and had no information on the sources of carbon monoxide. Conclusions: Carbon monoxide suicides substantially increased in South Korea over the relatively short study period and showed some distinct sodo-demographic characteristics compared with suicides by other methods. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.
Appears in
Collections:
1. Basic Science > Department of Preventive Medicine > 1. Journal Articles

qrcode

Items in ScholarWorks are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Related Researcher

Researcher

Lee, Won Jin
예방의학교실
Read more

Views & Downloads

MENU