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Effect of Probiotics in Stress-Associated Constipation Model in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Larvaeopen access

Authors
Lee, AyoungKim, Seung YoungKang, SeyoungKang, Seong HeeKim, Dong WooChoe, Jung WanHyun, Jong JinJung, Sung WooJung, Young KulKoo, Ja SeolYim, Hyung JoonKim, Suhyun
Issue Date
Apr-2024
Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)
Keywords
zebrafish; light; stress; constipation; B. longum
Citation
International Journal of Molecular Sciences, v.25, no.7
Indexed
SCIE
SCOPUS
Journal Title
International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Volume
25
Number
7
URI
https://scholarworks.korea.ac.kr/kumedicine/handle/2021.sw.kumedicine/66196
DOI
10.3390/ijms25073669
ISSN
1661-6596
1422-0067
Abstract
The pathophysiology of functional bowel disorders is complex, involving disruptions in gut motility, visceral hypersensitivity, gut-brain-microbiota interactions, and psychosocial factors. Light pollution, as an environmental stressor, has been associated with disruptions in circadian rhythms and the aggravation of stress-related conditions. In this study, we investigated the effects of environmental stress, particularly continuous light exposure, on intestinal motility and inflammation using zebrafish larvae as a model system. We also evaluated the efficacy of probiotics, specifically Bifidobacterium longum (B. longum), at alleviating stress-induced constipation. Our results showed that continuous light exposure in zebrafish larvae increased the cortisol levels and reduced the intestinal motility, establishing a stress-induced-constipation model. We observed increased inflammatory markers and decreased intestinal neural activity in response to stress. Furthermore, the expressions of aquaporins and vasoactive intestinal peptide, crucial for regulating water transport and intestinal motility, were altered in the light-induced constipation model. Administration of probiotics, specifically B. longum, ameliorated the stress-induced constipation by reducing the cortisol levels, modulating the intestinal inflammation, and restoring the intestinal motility and neural activity. These findings highlight the potential of probiotics to modulate the gut-brain axis and alleviate stress-induced constipation. Therefore, this study provides a valuable understanding of the complex interplay among environmental stressors, gut function, and potential therapeutic strategies.
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Jung, Young Kul
Ansan Hospital (Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Ansan Hospital)
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